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Category Archive for 'Chernorudsky'

In June of this year, I read the history column in my local paper, that’s written by my friend Mike Lawler, head of the Crescenta Valley Historical Association. The column described how a Dr. Max Gecht had owned a sanitarium in La Crescenta on a site that I can see from my kitchen window. I […]

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I have finally recovered from the Genealogy Jamboree held June 7-10, 2012 in Burbank, California. I have attended for years (since the event was much smaller, and held in Pasadena), and keep coming back. Wanna know why? Here is what I learned: Cath Madden Trindle’s lecture, “FDR’s Alphabet Soup: Records from the Great Depression,” pinpointed […]

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Chernorudsky Brick Wall

My grandfather had a sister, Clara Chernorudskaya. She married a man named Getsi Finkelstein in Zhitomir (now in Ukraine), who owned a toy store. They had a son named Aron. She and Getsi divorced, and Getsi remarried. This is a 1926 picture of Getsi with the children from his second marriage. Clara emigrated to Chicago, […]

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I’ve spent the last few hours roaming the screens of a Russian-language genealogy website, the name of which translates to Jewish Roots: http://www.forum.j-roots.info/index.php The site is jam-packed with conversations among Russian-speaking genealogists about their family names, geographic locations, and ways to find out more about it all. My Russian is rusty, but I read well […]

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My Grandpa, the Union Organizer

In 2008, I hit genealogical pay dirt at the Chicago History Museum and Archives. Their holdings included boxes of material from the Amalgamated Clothing Workers union, for which my grandfather, Benjamin Chernorudsky (aka Ben Share), had been an organizer back in the 1920s. One box contained an old fashioned telephone directory, about 4” by 8” […]

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The Amalgamated

My grandpa Benjamin Chernorudsky (aka Share) was an organizer for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union in the 1920s. According to family stories, grandpa was on the negotiating team for the first 40 hour work week for tailors and cutters in Chicago – back then, a 6-day 48 hour week was standard. While visiting the Chicago […]

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