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Monthly Archive for February, 2013

Today is Thankful Thursday, and the end of the Family History Writing Challenge. Here is what I am thankful for, now that the Challenge is complete. I am thankful that I was able to create 25 of the planned 28 posts during February, more than all the posts I have created in the 6 years […]

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Morris Newlander was my great-grandfather Isaac Kishinevsky’s older brother. Practically from the time he arrived in Chicago from Tiraspol, Morris owned a cigar factory of one sort or another. Business names and year of establishment were M Newlander & Company in 1899, Van Loo Cigar Company in 1911, and La Polina cigars (year unknown). The […]

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On this Tech Tuesday, I am creating my schedule for attending RootsTech, the conference that targets people who are at the intersection of genealogy and technology. This means software programmers who write programs and apps for genealogists to use, and genealogists who want to learn more about how technology can help us both with genealogy […]

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For Mappy Monday, I just found a little gem tucked into the end-pages of Vsia Rossia, the All-Russia business directory, digitized by a library in Russia. The document was published in 1895, so it is long out of copyright, and fair game for using here. Guberniya (provincial) boundaries are shown in green, and roads in […]

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I’m declaring yesterday as Slonim Sunday (I somehow always seem to get behind when blogging…). Slonim is the town in which my grandma Sophie Klebanskaya was born in 1895. It was in Poland then, and she and her family spoke Polish (not Yiddish) at home. Today it is located in Belarus. Something exciting and Slonim […]

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In honor of Thrifty Thursday, I want to compare what food cost 100 years ago to what it costs today. A nifty website from the Historical Text Archive shows costs for many food staples for the years 1914, 1924, 1976, and 2002. The more recent data comes from Starkville, Mississippi, rather than the large urban […]

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I am declaring today as Vatnik Vednesday. My great-grandmother Anna Klebansky’s maiden name was Anna Israelovna Vatnik (1858-1954). The name Vatnik is based on the Russian root word “vata” which means batting – the stuff that gets put into quilted bedding or clothing. The name Vatnik means a quilted jacket, and by extension, “maker of […]

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  My grandmother, Sophia Klebanskaya, was 17 when she left Volkovysk for the United States in 1912.  She traveled on the SS Finland, from Antwerp to New York. She remembered traveling in spring; but according to her passenger list, the ship left Antwerp on November 30 and arrived in New York on December 12. She […]

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I’m a genealogist, so I am interested in the stories of those who are no longer with us. But I am also concerned with finding the offspring of those who are long dead, to knit back parts of families that have long been separated. Obituaries can be a wonderful source of information – a skein […]

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When I first started researching my family history, I didn’t know you were supposed to start from the present and work your way back. I knew only that my Kishinevsky family was living in the US by 1901, because my great-aunt Sadelle was born that year in Chicago. So I decided to search the 1900 […]

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